Answered

Rover MPPT 20A controller

Posted by raydas

Aug 16, 2019 at 5:44am

****A disclaimer, this thread contains material and discussions that is "...dangerous and not productive...". I guess that warning should satisfy everybody.
****
I have read the manual for this device and I have some questions.

Because I have electronics connected to the Load terminal, what is the voltage range on this? When I measure the voltage, at the Load terminal connectors, with no power from the solar panels, it looks like it is battery voltage. So, does that mean that when the solar panels are functioning and the battery voltage is up to ~14V, does that mean that the Load voltage is also ~14V?

When the panels are working and the battery is fully charged, Rover is in float, is the Load getting the power from the battery or is it getting power from the solar panel directly, or a combination of both?

I have a Gigabyte Brix n2807 computer connected to the Load, so far it seems to be working as expected. But, now I am curious that if the Load gets up ~14V, what is that doing to the computer. Not sure if the computer electrical is that tolerant, will it eventually get fried with ~14V input.

Posted by bupkis

Aug 16, 2019 at 6:24am

battery voltage which of course can be in the upper 14s+ when charging. ie same as connecting directly to battery.

In float power comes from the battery but that power is replaced by the panels, if enough power is used that the panels can not keep the battery voltage in float then eventually the controller will change modes to bulk and start the charging cycle over.

have no idea about your computers' DC input. They make gadgets that can regulate voltage.

In the RV world folks believe their fridge's DC brain has a 15.3v limit as stated by one fridge maker and adjust equalize voltage to avoid such voltage.

Posted by raydas

Aug 16, 2019 at 7:02am

My volt meter is getting a real workout today. It looks like the Load voltage is the same as what the battery voltage is. Meaning, the battery is being charged, it is now at 13V, and the Load voltage is also at 13V. I think I have seen the battery voltage up 14V when getting a boost charge, I think. So far my computer, that is attached, has not blown up on me, yet.

It would be nice if the Load would have some kind of regulated voltage, so if the battery gets up to 14V, for a longer period of time, the Load would remain at ~12V-12.5V regulated.

I know somebody is going to mention that I put an external DC-DC regulator at the Load terminal, I know a little bit about doing some wiring. Not sure if I could find a DC-DC 12V 15A regulator, that would work in my setup, and then have it wired correctly.

So, I can assume that the Rover controller is all about the battery, every function of the controller is to keep the battery charged. Maybe I should start thinking about grabbing the load off the battery directly. Not sure what kind of usage I could do with the Rover Load.

Posted by tattoo

Aug 16, 2019 at 7:10am

raydas Avatar

Aug 16, 2019 at 7:02am raydas said:

 It would be nice if the Load would have some kind of regulated voltage, so if the battery gets up to 14V, for a longer period of time, the Load would remain at ~12V-12.5V regulated.


Can I ask why not just hook it up to an inverter?? That way you won't have to worry about it?? Or is your device just 12v?

Posted by raydas

Aug 16, 2019 at 8:01am

Since all this solar stuff is very new to me, I am not sure which is the best way to go, and not waste a lot of money because of incorrect decisions.

What I have heard, so far, about inverters, is that they use a lot of power, just to produce the AC power. I got the impression that inverters are very inefficient way of producing power. Now, I do not want to spend a large bundle of money on batteries and find out that my setup needs even more batteries, which leads too more panels to charge the batteries. This scenario might sound good for the Renogy pocket book, but …

As for the computer, it needs 12V 5 Amps, it came with a power supply that is rated for that. My assumption is, that it could work off a DC supply directly. Also, with the power supply that came with the computer, I could plug it into an inverter. What this leads to is, how efficient are the inverters these days. Maybe another thread to talk about inverters.

Posted by Admin

Aug 16, 2019 at 8:58am

raydas Avatar

Aug 16, 2019 at 5:44am raydas said:

I have read the manual for this device and I have some questions.

Because I have electronics connected to the Load terminal, what is the voltage range on this? When I measure the voltage, at the Load terminal connectors, with no power from the solar panels, it looks like it is battery voltage. So, does that mean that when the solar panels are functioning and the battery voltage is up to ~14V, does that mean that the Load voltage is also ~14V?

When the panels are working and the battery is fully charged, Rover is in float, is the Load getting the power from the battery or is it getting power from the solar panel directly, or a combination of both?

I have a Gigabyte Brix n2807 computer connected to the Load, so far it seems to be working as expected. But, now I am curious that if the Load gets up ~14V, what is that doing to the computer. Not sure if the computer electrical is that tolerant, will it eventually get fried with ~14V input.




The load terminal will essentially mirror the battery voltage. So it could be assumed that the over-voltage disconnect will be the threshold for the load terminal. You would want to make sure your electronics fall under this DC voltage range.

-Renogy Team

Posted by tattoo

Aug 16, 2019 at 10:28am

Admin Avatar

Aug 16, 2019 at 8:58am Admin said:

The load terminal will essentially mirror the battery voltage. So it could be assumed that the over-voltage disconnect will be the threshold for the load terminal. You would want to make sure your electronics fall under this DC voltage range.

-Renogy Team


That's very good to know..... I had no idea they were the same voltage.....


So answer this..... Why do so many people get error codes hooked up to the load terminal if it's the same voltage as the battery??

Posted by tattoo

Aug 16, 2019 at 10:33am

raydas Avatar

Aug 16, 2019 at 8:01am raydas said:

 What I have heard, so far, about inverters, is that they use a lot of power, just to produce the AC power. I got the impression that inverters are very inefficient way of producing power.


Yes all inverters take power to run...... They are using power ALL the time even when they are not being used if they are turned on that is.........


The  key here is to not get an inverter bigger than you need...... I started with a 2000w and figured right quick that it was way to large because of the power it was using so I bought a 500w and it works great...... But if I'm running a table saw or something like that I switch to the 2000w so I do need it sometimes..... No one tells you not to buy a huge inverter if you don't need it but they should and I have several times but people know better than I......


Also with an inverter you won't have to worry about the batteries fluctuating voltage.....

Posted by Admin

Aug 16, 2019 at 11:37am

tattoo Avatar

Aug 16, 2019 at 10:28am tattoo said:

Admin Avatar

Aug 16, 2019 at 8:58am Admin said:

The load terminal will essentially mirror the battery voltage. So it could be assumed that the over-voltage disconnect will be the threshold for the load terminal. You would want to make sure your electronics fall under this DC voltage range.

-Renogy Team


That's very good to know..... I had no idea they were the same voltage.....

So answer this..... Why do so many people get error codes hooked up to the load terminal if it's the same voltage as the battery??




Depends on the error code specifically. There is still a current threshold limitations on the load terminals depending on the controller.


-Renogy Team

Posted by tattoo

Aug 16, 2019 at 1:17pm

Admin Avatar

Aug 16, 2019 at 11:37am Admin said:

Depends on the error code specifically. There is still a current threshold limitations on the load terminals depending on the controller.


-Renogy Team


It's the same error code that everyone gets that try and use the load side with a large device..... Many times it's not even that large......


I know better than to use it......

Posted by raydas

Aug 16, 2019 at 1:34pm

Yes, you can add my name to the list of getting an error code, while using the Load.

Today I was trying to add another device to my load strip, and of course I got the error code after the Load power shutdown. I guess it is reaching that annoying point.

Posted by tattoo

Aug 16, 2019 at 3:26pm

raydas Avatar

Aug 16, 2019 at 1:34pm raydas said:

Yes, you can add my name to the list of getting an error code, while using the Load.

Today I was trying to add another device to my load strip, and of course I got the error code after the Load power shutdown. I guess it is reaching that annoying point.


The load side isn't designed to run much more than just lights..... You have been very lucky...... It's time for you to buy a small inverter...... Error code will be solved.........

Posted by raydas

Aug 16, 2019 at 4:08pm

Yep, I am working out a new design, in my head, for a new setup of the system. I just looked at my solar station and I noticed that my computer, that is hooked to the Load power strip, is shutdown. I hope it did not give up the smoke. I will have to figure some other non important job for the Load side.

Posted by bupkis

Aug 16, 2019 at 4:58pm

the common error is E04 load short circuit. I person figured it out as a switch, others don't communicate or stay here long enough to decipher the issue.

Posted by raydas

Aug 17, 2019 at 5:24am

In my case I got an error of, Load short circuit or an overload, did not catch the error code number itself.


Posted by raydas

Aug 17, 2019 at 6:12am

I just did a check of my computer that was connected to the Load, and somehow was turned off. The computer survived, I put it on AC power and it started up like nothing ever happened.

I was running the "Solar Station Monitor" program with the save option. The last entry in the .csv file was:


Date Time,Station Name,Device ID,Array Current(A),Array Voltage(V),Array Power(W),Working State,Battery Voltage(V),Battery Temp.(?),Battery Current(A),Battery SOC(%),Load Current(A),Load Power(W),Load Voltage(V),Load State,Device Temp.(?),Battery State,Charging State,Controller Working State
18:00:02,sta1,01,0.00,17.1,0,MPPT,12.6,25,0.07,73,0.97,12,12.4,1,31,No,Normal,Normal


The only unusual item is the array voltage(V)-17.1V. It seems like the battery array voltage was 12.6V. Now I am not sure what happened. It does not look like there was an undercurrent or overcurrent. This why I like to collect data, so when things do occur, sometimes I can derive an answer.

Posted by tattoo

Aug 17, 2019 at 6:20am

raydas Avatar

Aug 17, 2019 at 6:12am raydas said:

  sometimes I can derive an answer.


The answer is don't hook anything other than a light to the load side of the CC.............


More than likely it doesn't come out well............ Not always but 90% of the time.....

Posted by russ

Aug 17, 2019 at 12:41pm

I like to use the load output of the charge controller for powering lots of 12 volt equipment. Most equipment, such as a car stereo or a 12 volt common computer router work just fine with the charge controller output voltage fluctuation such as when the system is charging the battery and the load output voltage is over 14 volts. But for sensitive electronics you can get a inexpensive dc to dc regulator to regulate convert the voltage. To power usb devices off the charge controller load output I use a 5A adjustable voltage regulator that will convert from 12-24 volts to 5 volts. And for my notebook computers one that rated at 5 amps that converts and regulates from 12-32 volts to 12-35 volts, adjusted to 19 volts output. I find this much more efficient than using an 117 volt inverter and the notebook power supply.

Of course, a 117 volt inverter should be connected directly to the battery.

[Edit]

Also, you most definitely don't want to connect anything to the charge controller load output that has a starting surge such as a motor, or other inductive type loads. The Rover load output is rated at 20 amps. I consider this a hard limit, meaning no start surges that might exceed 20 amps.

[/Edit]

Posted by mediadogg

Aug 17, 2019 at 1:08pm

Good info russ, but again I question the justification for using the load output of a charge controller, unless you are depending on the timer feature. Personally, when I use the load output, it is usually only as a trigger to drive a non-inductive switch of some sort, that is controlling power. If I don't need the trigger, I just connect my loads (fused) directly to the battery, or to an inverter as needed. You can get cheap AC and DC timers if you want to prevent the loads from draining the battery during some time interval.

You mentioned some cool DC-DC converters that some people might not know about. Here are some that I have used:

12V > 5V

12V to USB 3.0 and Type C (cigarette lighter adapter)

Coolgear desktop version of 12V to Type C and USB 3.0

Coolgear pcb version of 12V to type C and USB 3.0

Harbor Freight Solar Charge Controller - multiple DC output (there is a schematic for this on the net somewhere. Just connect across the battery and ignore the charge controller function. I plugged in one of the cigarette lighter adapters for USB 3.0 and type C, and made custom cables for the other DC outputs).

Programmable USB Type C PD to specific DC out (5V, 9V, 12V, 15V, 20V) - use thse to make custom cables to power laptops, Alexa, other devices

Versatile, adjustable step down DC voltage converter

PD Buddy Sink project (actually I have not used this one yet)

Using LM317t voltage regulator 

Posted by russ

Aug 18, 2019 at 12:35am

mediadogg Avatar

Aug 17, 2019 at 1:08pm mediadogg said:

Good info russ, but again I question the justification for using the load output of a charge controller, unless you are depending on the timer feature. Personally, when I use the load output, it is usually only as a trigger to drive a non-inductive switch of some sort, that is controlling power. If I don't need the trigger, I just connect my loads (fused) directly to the battery, or to an inverter as needed. You can get cheap AC and DC timers if you want to prevent the loads from draining the battery during some time interval.


That is a good point. Unless you need the timer feature, or switching the load on at night, you may as well connect your load directly to the battery. In any case, it is not going to cause problems connecting the load directly to the battery. But, improper loads connected to the load output of the controller can cause problems, or damage to the controller.


Also, as you pointed out, fusing the loads are important. I use a 12 volt terminal strip connected to the charge controller load output that is fused at 15 amps. The charge controller load output is rated at 20 amps. And each individual load from the terminal strip is fused. Last, but not least, the wiring from the solar panels to the charge controller should be fused as well as the wiring from the charge controller to the battery. (I know you know this Mediadogg, I just think it is good to explain thoroughly.)

Posted by tattoo

Aug 18, 2019 at 6:07am

russ Avatar

Aug 18, 2019 at 12:35am russ said:

 But, improper loads connected to the load output of the controller can cause problems, or damage to the controller.


Yes sir I agree..... Hence my post...... Why hook anything to the load side of the CC?


It is so restricted to what you can run on it why bother? That is a question?

Posted by Admin

Aug 20, 2019 at 4:00pm

bupkis Avatar

Aug 16, 2019 at 4:58pm bupkis said:

the common error is E04 load short circuit. I person figured it out as a switch, others don't communicate or stay here long enough to decipher the issue.




Can you elaborate by person figured it out as a switch?

-Renogy Team

Posted by raydas

Aug 21, 2019 at 3:20am

I have been using the Load, for a while now, if used correctly, it works as advertised.

Posted by bupkis

Aug 21, 2019 at 4:44am

Admin Avatar

Aug 20, 2019 at 4:00pm Admin said:

bupkis Avatar

Aug 16, 2019 at 4:58pm bupkis said:

the common error is E04 load short circuit. I person figured it out as a switch, others don't communicate or stay here long enough to decipher the issue.


Can you elaborate by person figured it out as a switch?

-Renogy Team


someone, months ago that had some sense was getting E04. I think with a max air or some type of fan (12v ceiling fan). Thru some test determined the max air switch was flaky and momentarily shorted or arced when turned on.

Posted by mediadogg

Aug 21, 2019 at 8:45am

I have a question for the Renogy Team: Can the Rover 20A MPPT supply 20A to the load concurrently with charging, or is that a combined total? The legacy uses for the load terminal involved turning on lights that would burn at night from energy stored during the day, so in that scenario the load would not be powered while the controller was charging the battery. So, can the Rover supply up to 20A for charging the battery concurrently with 20A for the load, or is 20A a combined total? I also own one of these units.

Posted by Admin

Aug 21, 2019 at 8:58am

mediadogg Avatar

Aug 21, 2019 at 8:45am mediadogg said:

I have a question for the Renogy Team: Can the Rover 20A MPPT supply 20A to the load concurrently with charging, or is that a combined total? The legacy uses for the load terminal involved turning on lights that would burn at night from energy stored during the day, so in that scenario the load would not be powered while the controller was charging the battery. So, can the Rover supply up to 20A for charging the battery concurrently with 20A for the load, or is 20A a combined total? I also own one of these units.




The load controller rating (20A) indicates the max amps it should be able to supply to the battery. In the event you have a 20A load draw from the load terminal (supplied by battery), this would mean that the solar output not be charging your battery, but instead powering your load. So technically, your battery would be discharging because it is neither charging nor floating.

-Renogy Team

Posted by raydas

Aug 21, 2019 at 9:06am

A question for Renogy about how the float state works. Is it providing some current range at a constant rate. Or does it go into idle state, then checks to see if needs some current, then starts charging again.

Posted by tattoo

Aug 21, 2019 at 11:25am

raydas Avatar

Aug 21, 2019 at 9:06am raydas said:

  Or does it go into idle state, then checks to see if needs some current, then starts charging again.


There is no idle state where the CC does no charging what so ever...... Other than at night....


Now on a Li battery you got me as I don't care for them........... I'd say no but we shall see..........

Posted by raydas

Aug 22, 2019 at 5:34am

I hope Renogy can clarify a few things about the float charge activity. Below is from the Rover MPPT manual.

Float Charge: After the constant voltage stage, the controller will reduce the battery voltage to a float voltage set point. Once the battery is fully charged, there will be no more chemical reactions and all the charge current would turn into heat or gas. Because of this,
the charge controller will reduce the voltage charge to smaller quantity, while lightly charging the battery. The purpose for this is to offset the power consumption while maintaining a full battery storage capacity. In the event that a load drawn from the battery exceeds the charge current, the controller will no longer be able to maintain the battery to a Float set point and the controller will end the float charge stage and refer back to bulk charging.



First thing, "...while lightly charging the battery.". What exactly is lightly charging, maybe some numbers could clarify this.

"...reduce the battery voltage to a float voltage set point.". Maybe some numbers could be beneficial.

"Once the battery is fully charged, there will be no more chemical reactions and all the charge current would turn into heat or gas.". The gas part occurs in the battery, but the heat part occurs where.

With more lithium batteries coming into the market, how is this float charge going the affect the functionality and longevity of lithium batteries. The lithium batteries have a, number of times it can be charged, associated with it, right.

I have other questions, but this in segments may be the best approach.

Posted by bupkis

Aug 22, 2019 at 6:04am

different battery makers use different chemistry so the battery maker is the best source for battery charging specifics like
www.trojanbattery.com/tech-support/battery-maintenance/

lightly charging is enough power to maintain the float set pt voltage. It takes a certain voltage to keep the battery from self discharging and a proper float voltage does that with very little power. Float is the sweet spot between charging and self discharging, just enough. Ideally a battery could be floated indefinitely and maintain 100% of its capacity.

What does the Rover manual show for float voltage for your type of battery? Happy to look it up but spoon feeding is not called for!

Float voltage is different for each maker/type of battery, check the battery maker for specifics, generally low 13v to upper 13v.

the heat occurs in the battery, that is where the reaction occurs, along with over gassing is bad for a battery's lifespan.

While a traditional float is avoided in LI, setting a CC flot voltage low enough means it actually is not floated ie no power is needed to maintain the battery since its voltage is higher than float setting. If loads lower battery voltage low enough then the charge cycle will restart (well above float).



Posted by mediadogg

Aug 22, 2019 at 8:25am

This has been one of my "go to" places to learn and understand things about batteries. Battery University.

Posted by raydas

Aug 22, 2019 at 8:32am

Thank You, bupkis.

Float voltage is different for each maker/type of battery, check the battery maker for specifics, generally low 13v to upper 13v.


So, if it is upper, = 14V, this would be nice to know. How does the Rover CC know what your battery make is, let alone the float charge requirements. On my battery I did not see any smart chip, that would contain this information, and be able to transfer that information to the CC. Or maybe the Rover CC is now smart enough to determine all this.

OK, so I took a closer look at the manual, and of course I missed the 'Programming Parameters', part. I guess the Rover CC can be set. These are the items - Equalizing voltage, Boost voltage, over-discharge voltage, over-discharge return voltage, float voltage. It has a battery type and system voltage selection also. So, what kinds of settings are the most appropriate. Since I have a 100Ah deep cycle SLA, I will track down the manufacturer and find out what sort of information is available.

Does somebody have a short guide to what the settings really mean and how to apply them to the Rover CC, for the best functionality of the solar system. I did not realize I would have to become a battery expert. When does the plug and play become available for this stuff. :-)

Posted by bupkis

Aug 22, 2019 at 8:57am

set it Sealed and be done with it. As you can see in the manual specs, www.renogy.com/content/Manual/RNG-CTRL-RVR203040.pdf

on page 24 to be specific. You did not answer what rover uses for float for your battery type!!!!

so the sealed column shows equalize @ 14.6v this is an intentional overcharge monthly for 2 hrs - leave it alone!
Boost voltage is the first set pt voltage of 14.4v leave it, this is the constant charging voltage for 2 hrs.
Float of ???? typical for sealed/agm batteries.boost retun v, if battery voltage goes below this bulk/boost start over.low voltage reconnect, if the load terminals turn off due to low voltage they turn back on at this voltage


if you find you need to change anything see page 16.

Posted by raydas

Aug 22, 2019 at 9:05am

I have the Rover 20A MPPT RS232-USB version, and using the manual that came with that. Hopefully using the manual that you pointed to will be somewhat applicable to my Rover CC. I will compare the two manuals for any subtle differences.

Posted by raydas

Aug 22, 2019 at 9:55am

OK, first big surprise, when I use the Rover CC keys to work through LED choices, the only thing the <- and ->, keys do is turn the Load on and off. I tried to find where the battery setting is, but none of the selections are showing this.

Second surprise, when you do use the <- -> keys it seems to affect the RS232-USB, where it is turning off my Gigabyte Brix computer, which is connected to the Rover CC.

So at this point I do not know what battery type the Rover CC is assuming it is charging. Does it make a difference in functionality between charging up a plain lead acid battery vs a deep cycle SLA battery.

Posted by russ

Aug 22, 2019 at 10:04am

raydas Avatar

Aug 21, 2019 at 9:06am raydas said:

A question for Renogy about how the float state works. Is it providing some current range at a constant rate. Or does it go into idle state, then checks to see if needs some current, then starts charging again.


When the charge controller is in float mode, it is a constant voltage charge mode but with a reduced voltage so as to maintain the battery without overcharging it. The voltage level depends upon the battery chemistry and construction. Float voltage should be a level that the battery can withstand for long periods when fully charged.

Posted by Admin

Aug 22, 2019 at 10:18am

raydas Avatar

Aug 16, 2019 at 7:02am raydas said:

My volt meter is getting a real workout today. It looks like the Load voltage is the same as what the battery voltage is. Meaning, the battery is being charged, it is now at 13V, and the Load voltage is also at 13V. I think I have seen the battery voltage up 14V when getting a boost charge, I think. So far my computer, that is attached, has not blown up on me, yet.

It would be nice if the Load would have some kind of regulated voltage, so if the battery gets up to 14V, for a longer period of time, the Load would remain at ~12V-12.5V regulated.

I know somebody is going to mention that I put an external DC-DC regulator at the Load terminal, I know a little bit about doing some wiring. Not sure if I could find a DC-DC 12V 15A regulator, that would work in my setup, and then have it wired correctly.

So, I can assume that the Rover controller is all about the battery, every function of the controller is to keep the battery charged. Maybe I should start thinking about grabbing the load off the battery directly. Not sure what kind of usage I could do with the Rover Load.




The load terminal function is generally designed for lights. Normally loads should be directly connected to your battery bank.

-Renogy Team

Posted by bupkis

Aug 22, 2019 at 10:42am

raydas Avatar

Aug 22, 2019 at 9:55am raydas said:

OK, first big surprise, when I use the Rover CC keys to work through LED choices, the only thing the <- and ->, keys do is turn the Load on and off. I tried to find where the battery setting is, but none of the selections are showing this.

Second surprise, when you do use the <- -> keys it seems to affect the RS232-USB, where it is turning off my Gigabyte Brix computer, which is connected to the Rover CC.

So at this point I do not know what battery type the Rover CC is assuming it is charging. Does it make a difference in functionality between charging up a plain lead acid battery vs a deep cycle SLA battery.


The directions in the manual seem understandable, pressing the correct button and holding it enters program mode, you'll need to follow the directions.

As for battery type, I believe SLD is the default but you should be able to see it on the main display in the lower Right. A little battery symbol with SLD!

RoverLCD.jpg
click to enlarge

Posted by tattoo

Aug 22, 2019 at 10:57am

Admin Avatar

Aug 22, 2019 at 10:18am Admin said:

The load terminal function is generally designed for lights. Normally loads should be directly connected to your battery bank.

-Renogy Team


 Thank you.......................

Posted by bupkis

Aug 22, 2019 at 11:11am

Admin Avatar

Aug 22, 2019 at 10:18am Admin said:

raydas Avatar

Aug 16, 2019 at 7:02am raydas said:

My volt meter is getting a real workout today. It looks like the Load voltage is the same as what the battery voltage is. Meaning, the battery is being charged, it is now at 13V, and the Load voltage is also at 13V. I think I have seen the battery voltage up 14V when getting a boost charge, I think. So far my computer, that is attached, has not blown up on me, yet.

It would be nice if the Load would have some kind of regulated voltage, so if the battery gets up to 14V, for a longer period of time, the Load would remain at ~12V-12.5V regulated.

I know somebody is going to mention that I put an external DC-DC regulator at the Load terminal, I know a little bit about doing some wiring. Not sure if I could find a DC-DC 12V 15A regulator, that would work in my setup, and then have it wired correctly.

So, I can assume that the Rover controller is all about the battery, every function of the controller is to keep the battery charged. Maybe I should start thinking about grabbing the load off the battery directly. Not sure what kind of usage I could do with the Rover Load.


The load terminal function is generally designed for lights. Normally loads should be directly connected to your battery bank.

-Renogy Team


yes, some type of street light function BUT folks run their entire small RVs via the load terminals and suggest others do also cuz it meters usage!!!
Are you suggesting that a 20A load rating is limited to less than 20A?

Posted by raydas

Aug 22, 2019 at 11:14am

I held down the key, and all that shows is a tiny little flashing battery, with some tiny letters 'FLD'. When I try to change that it keeps popping back up with the 'FLD'.

As for the LCD screen that you show, that does not show up anywhere. I also tried holding the key down for more than a minute, and the screen never showed anything like your little picture. So, a quick press does nothing, and holding it down just shows the flashing 'FLD'. I must have a very old Rover MPPT CC, although I did buy the thing from Renogy, maybe ~ten months ago.

So, I am going to assume I have some antiquated Rover MPPT, which is set for flooded battery type, if that is what the 'FLD' means. I will have to take my 100Ah deep cycle SLA battery off line, and go from there. Now I have to do some research into what my next MPPT CC will be. There has to be some, with more functionality, MPPT CC units that are reasonably priced.

I am sure glad I came to this site for some information, what is next, I am going find out that my panels are only producing 40% of optimum, no matter what position the panel is facing the sun.

Posted by bupkis

Aug 22, 2019 at 11:18am

you need hand holding from tech support, call em
I find this type of programming intuitive, if you do not call for help.

when the FLD is flashing that is when one can change it and then move on to the next screen to change something else.

The screen I showed is never all light up at once but it shows where different item are located on the screen.

Another option is to use the solar monitor software to make changes.

Posted by raydas

Aug 22, 2019 at 11:36am

Just for clarification the 'Solar Station Monitor' program only allows you to turn on/off the Load, which I am going to try next, just to see if that works.

Posted by Admin

Aug 22, 2019 at 11:43am

bupkis Avatar

Aug 22, 2019 at 11:11am bupkis said:

Admin Avatar

Aug 22, 2019 at 10:18am Admin said:

The load terminal function is generally designed for lights. Normally loads should be directly connected to your battery bank.

-Renogy Team


yes, some type of street light function BUT folks run their entire small RVs via the load terminals and suggest others do also cuz it meters usage!!!
Are you suggesting that a 20A load rating is limited to less than 20A?




The Load Rating is max 20A for the 20A and above models, and max 10A for the 10A models. In regards to the metering, where else do people suggest they use this? Future development could potentially axe this and leave it as just a work mode only.


-Renogy Team

Posted by Admin

Aug 22, 2019 at 11:47am

raydas Avatar

Aug 22, 2019 at 11:14am raydas said:

I held down the key, and all that shows is a tiny little flashing battery, with some tiny letters 'FLD'. When I try to change that it keeps popping back up with the 'FLD'.

As for the LCD screen that you show, that does not show up anywhere. I also tried holding the key down for more than a minute, and the screen never showed anything like your little picture. So, a quick press does nothing, and holding it down just shows the flashing 'FLD'. I must have a very old Rover MPPT CC, although I did buy the thing from Renogy, maybe ~ten months ago.

So, I am going to assume I have some antiquated Rover MPPT, which is set for flooded battery type, if that is what the 'FLD' means. I will have to take my 100Ah deep cycle SLA battery off line, and go from there. Now I have to do some research into what my next MPPT CC will be. There has to be some, with more functionality, MPPT CC units that are reasonably priced.

I am sure glad I came to this site for some information, what is next, I am going find out that my panels are only producing 40% of optimum, no matter what position the panel is facing the sun.




Hold down right arrow for programming mode, then when flashing, select the up and down arrows to manuever through different battery types and chose SLD, then select the right arrow again to go to next program setting. Once done, hold down the right arrow again and confirm.

The rover from 10 months ago should still be in line with the manual.

www.renogy.com/content/Manual/RNG-CTRL-RVR203040.pdf


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Posted by Admin

Aug 22, 2019 at 11:57am

raydas Avatar

Aug 22, 2019 at 11:36am raydas said:

Just for clarification the 'Solar Station Monitor' program only allows you to turn on/off the Load, which I am going to try next, just to see if that works.




You are incorrect, it can do much more.

It will be under software downloads

www.renogy.com/learn/#tab_downloads

Bottom left


SOFTWARE DOWNLOADS
The monitoring software needs to be opened with "7zip" software
Renogy Commander MPPT Charge Controller solar Monitoring Software

Rover 20Amp /40Amp MPPT Solar Charge Controller Solar Monitoring Software


Posted by raydas

Aug 22, 2019 at 12:03pm

So, after messing with the settings do dad, I was able to set it to 12V system, and 'SLD', that looked like the only close thing to SLA. I think I have this set up for 12V system and SLA battery.

I guess a general note - This is not a plug and play device.

Posted by raydas

Aug 22, 2019 at 12:48pm

You are incorrect, it can do much more.


You are correct, I found the 'parameters' in the monitor program. The only changes that I could make were the battery type, and battery capacity. Every thing else is preset and cannot be changed. This seemed easier and more intuitive then the LCD selection process.

Will their be another CC that will have a monitor program, that can be viewed on the computer?

Posted by tattoo

Aug 22, 2019 at 1:52pm

raydas Avatar

Aug 22, 2019 at 12:03pm raydas said:

 I guess a general note - This is not a plug and play device.


NOTHING is in solar.......... Especially when you don't follow directions to the letter.........

Posted by raydas

Aug 22, 2019 at 2:02pm

Come on tattoo, give me a break. I think everybody in this universe has gotten your point. I do not think that you have to keep making that point over and over again, it gets to be very annoying and non-productive. Unless, of course, you have some kind of agenda, that has not been revealed yet, for everybody on this forum.

Posted by tattoo

Aug 22, 2019 at 3:01pm

raydas Avatar

Aug 22, 2019 at 2:02pm raydas said:

Come on tattoo, give me a break. I think everybody in this universe has gotten your point. I do not think that you have to keep making that point over and over again, it gets to be very annoying and non-productive.


I have given you a huge break.... But when you say things like {I guess a general note - This is not a plug and play device.} I'm going to address what you say as I'm not convinced you understand solar yet......... It's not the CC fault you can't follow directions......


So I guess it's up to you what I say...............

Posted by raydas

Aug 22, 2019 at 4:08pm

So be it, have your fun, tattoo.

I was just looking at the solar monitor program and it was showing this:
Battery voltage - 12.8V Battery current - 0.46A
Load voltage - 10.5V Load current - 0.38A
Not sure what the 10.5V Load voltage is telling me. Now, for the current I can 0.46 - 0.38 = 0.08 -> what the Rover CC is using. For the Load voltage I was expecting that to be 12.8V, the same as the battery.

When I switch my configuration from using the Load to using the battery, I was trying to figure out how to get some accurate current usage of the devices that will be attached to the battery. I guess I can use the 0.08A as the Rover usage rate. I am wondering if that is constant current usage for the Rover or does that change at some point.

Posted by bupkis

Aug 22, 2019 at 4:36pm

makes no sense, I would be at the ready with my voltmeter to measure the CC terminals directly as load should equal battery.

Posted by tattoo

Aug 22, 2019 at 4:36pm

raydas Avatar

Aug 22, 2019 at 4:08pm raydas said:

So be it, have your fun, tattoo.


Like I said it's up to you........